Audience

Restaurants and food retailers in Connecticut (CT), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Maine (ME), Maryland (MD), Massachusetts (MA), Minnesota (MN), New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Rhode Island (RI), South Carolina (SC) and Texas (TX) that have recently purchased oysters from Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ), harvested from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024.

Consumers in CT, FL, GA, MA, MD, ME, MN, NJ, OH, RI, SC, and TX who have recently purchased oysters from Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ), harvested from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024.

Product

Recalled oysters are from Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ), harvested from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024. The oysters were distributed to restaurants and retailers in CT, FL, GA, MA, MD, ME, MN, NJ, OH, RI, SC, and TX, and may have been distributed to other states as well.

Purpose

The FDA is notifying restaurants, food retailers, and consumers that the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Aquaculture is conducting a recall of oysters harvested by Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ) from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024, because they are associated with a norovirus outbreak in Minnesota and may be contaminated with norovirus. The FDA is advising restaurants and food retailers not to serve or sell and consumers not to eat the recalled oysters.

Shellfish contaminated with norovirus can cause illness if eaten, and potentially severe illness in people with compromised immune systems. Food containing norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal. Consumers of these products who are experiencing symptoms of illness should contact their healthcare provider and report their symptoms to their local Health Department. Diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, and fever may be associated with gastroenteritis infections caused by this organism.

Symptoms of Norovirus

People of all ages can get infected and sick with norovirus. The most common symptoms of norovirus are diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and stomach pain. Other symptoms include fever, headache, and body ache.

A person usually develops symptoms 12 to 48 hours after being exposed to norovirus. Most people with norovirus illness get better within 1 to 3 days.

If you have norovirus illness, you can feel extremely ill, and vomit or have diarrhea many times a day. This can lead to dehydration, especially in young children, older adults, and people with other illnesses. Symptoms of dehydration include decrease in urination, dry mouth and throat, and feeling dizzy when standing up. Children who are dehydrated may cry with few or no tears and be unusually sleepy or fussy.

If you think you or someone you are caring for is severely dehydrated, call your healthcare provider

Summary of Problem and Scope

The Connecticut Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Aquaculture is conducting a recall of oysters from Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ), harvested from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024, because they are associated with a norovirus outbreak in Minnesota and may be contaminated with norovirus. The oysters were distributed to restaurants and retailers in CT, FL, GA, MA, MD, ME, MN, NJ, OH, RI, SC, and TX, and may have been distributed to other states as well. The FDA is advising consumers not to eat, and restaurants and food retailers not to sell, and to dispose of these oysters.

Contaminated oysters can cause illness if eaten raw, particularly in people with compromised immune systems. Food contaminated with norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal. Consumers of these products who are experiencing symptoms of norovirus illness should contact their healthcare provider, who should report their symptoms to their local Health Department.

FDA Actions

The FDA is sharing the notice of the CT oyster recallExternal Link Disclaimer and advising consumers not to eat, and restaurants and food retailers not to sell, oysters from Norm Bloom and Son (CT-069-SS, AQ), harvested from Westport, CT, lot 207, with the harvest date 2/20/2024, and distributed to restaurants and retailers in  CT, FL, GA, MA, MD, ME, MN, NJ, OH, RI, SC, and TX. The FDA is awaiting information on further interstate distribution of the oysters and will continue to monitor the investigation and provide assistance to state authorities as needed.

Recommendations for Restaurants and Retailers

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell the potentially contaminated oysters. Restaurants and retailers should dispose of any products by throwing them in the garbage or returning them to their distributor for destruction.

Restaurants and retailers should also be aware that shellfish may be a source of pathogens and should control the potential for cross-contamination of food processing equipment and the food processing environment. They should follow the steps below:

  • Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators who have processed and packaged any potentially contaminated products need to be concerned about cross-contamination of cutting surfaces and utensils through contact with the potentially contaminated products.
  • Retailers that have sold bulk product should clean and sanitize the containers used to hold the product.
  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the likelihood of cross-contamination.
Oyster-update-1-1536x1288

Oyster associated norovirus cases are also being reported in Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, and Los Angeles counties. Both the California Department of Public Health and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are now actively engaged in the investigation.  

The investigation of oyster-linked illnesses by County of San Diego health officials has expanded to include additional oyster harvest locations in Mexico. Health officials are recommending consumers and restaurants throw away any oysters imported from locations in Mexico until further notice. 

The local norovirus outbreak now includes 69 confirmed and probable cases. The severity of the infections in San Diego County has remained mild, with no hospitalizations reported to date. The initial investigations identified 41 probable and confirmed norovirus cases linked to oysters harvested in Sonora, Mexico. The sickened patrons dined at the Fish Shop chain and Carlsbad Aquafarm. Twenty-eight more cases have been added including 20 who ate oysters from other food venues.  

The FDA, which has jurisdiction over oysters imported into the country, issued an initial advisory on Jan. 11, based, at least in part, on the findings of the investigation conducted by County health officials.  

On Jan. 17th, the FDA issued a second advisory for Laguna De Guerrero Negro and Laguna Manuela, both on the Pacific Coast of Baja California, Mexico but locations geographically distant from Sonora. Today, FDA updated the initial advisory on Sonora oysters to include a second harvest location, Estero Morua. 

The new FDA recommendations advise restaurants and retailers to dispose of any oysters they still have or contact their distributor to coordinate return or destruction. People who have them in their homes should do the same. 

All of the implicated oysters were harvested in December 2023 and no oysters since then have been distributed to food venues in San Diego from those locations.  

Given the expanding number of harvest locations associated with illness and the potential of other sites to be involved, County Public Health is recommending against the use of all oysters imported from Mexico at this time. 

“The County recommends that people ask where oysters were harvested when eating out or getting food from wholesale locations to avoid consuming oysters imported from Mexico,” said Dr. Ankita Kadakia, Deputy County Public Health Officer. “Norovirus is typically a mild illness but can cause dehydration especially for the very young and very old. Given the increasing number of cases, the chance for others at greater risk for more severe illness in the same home is also increased. I want to remind people who become ill, and those that live with them, to wash their hands frequently to avoid contaminating surfaces and foods that could further spread the infection.”  

Eating raw oysters has been linked to outbreaks with other germs including Vibrio, Shigella, and E. coli, in addition to norovirus. If you eat raw or undercooked oysters, germs that might be in the oyster can make you sick.  

People who have or develop symptoms should reach out to their healthcare provider. To report illness to the County after dining out or purchasing from wholesale food locations call (858) 505-6814, or email fhdepi@sdcounty.ca.gov.  

More information on seafood and shellfish safety is available here, general information on norovirus is here, and prevention of norovirus spread in the home information is here

Wake County Public Health and Wake County Environmental Services are alerting the public of three confirmed cases of norovirus, all linked to a local Raleigh restaurant. Norovirus is a very contagious illness that can make people sick soon after coming in contact with an infected person, eating contaminated food, or touching contaminated surfaces. All individuals who became sick are recovering. Before they became ill, residents visited Sushi Nine, an Asian restaurant located at 3812 Western Blvd., Raleigh. 

The first person to report to Wake County about feeling ill after eating in the restaurant was Friday, Dec. 1. Staff immediately responded and initiated the investigation. Soon after more reports reached Wake County’s Public Health Communicable Disease team. In total 241 complaints were received, and all of those diners reported visiting the restaurant between Saturday, Nov. 28 and Tuesday, Dec. 5. Staff have been able to interview more than 170 of the complainants so far and all have been asked to give stool samples, the only way to lab test for norovirus. Only three people provided samples so far and all three samples came back positive for the norovirus. The County is continuing to investigate all complaints. 

The restaurant voluntarily closed for deep cleaning on Tuesday, Dec. 5. It has since reopened to the public. An environmental health consultant is conducting daily visits to the establishment. No new complaints have been reported since the restaurant reopened on Friday, Dec. 8.

Wake County is currently investigating all potential sources of exposure. And so far, the investigation is not pointing to a single type of food that might have been the source, as those who reported becoming sick ate a variety of menu items. It is common with norovirus investigations to not be able to narrow down to a specific source of contamination. 

A Denver elementary school is closed because of a norovirus outbreak. Teller Elementary, a Denver Public Schools campus in Congress Park, is closed on Friday, according to a letter sent to the school community.

“Over the last two days, we have seen a significant uptick in norovirus cases among our students and staff,” reads a letter sent Thursday and signed by the principal, assistant principal and dean.

The school will be closed “to allow our community to recover,” the administrators said, and to deep clean the campus. The school’s food pantry will be closed Friday and Saturday, as will after-school enrichments and Saturday school.

Norovirus is a highly contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s alternately called the “stomach flu” or a “stomach bug,” although it’s not related to the influenza virus.

Norovirus can spread by eating food or drinking liquids that are contaminated with it, by having direct contact with someone who has it or by touching surfaces contaminated with the virus and putting unwashed fingers in the mouth.

Restaurants and food retailers that have received shipments of oysters harvested from NS 10, an oyster harvest area in Nova Scotia, Canada on June 9, 2023, and were distributed by Bill and Stanley Oyster Co. of Nova Scotia, Canada through U.S. distributors to 17 states and the District of Columbia: CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IN, MA, MD, MI, MN, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TX, and WI. The FDA is working to obtain additional information on distribution of the oysters and will continue to monitor the investigation, provide assistance to state authorities, and update our communications to the public as needed.

Consumers, especially those who are or could become pregnant, the elderly, and persons with weakened immune systems, who have recently consumed raw oysters and suspect they have food poisoning should seek medical care immediately.

• Fortune brand oysters harvested from harvest location NS 10 in Nova Scotia, Canada on June 9, 2023 that were distributed to 17 states and the District of Columbia: CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IN, MA, MD, MI, MN, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TX, and WI.
• Oyster containers include the harvest area information and original shipper certification number NS 6024 SS WS on the attached product tag.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers not to eat, and restaurants and food retailers not to sell, and to dispose of raw oysters that were harvested from harvest location NS 10 in Nova Scotia, Canada on June 9, 2023 and were distributed to 17 states and the District of Columbia: CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IN, MA, MD, MI, MN, NJ, NY, OH, PA, TX, and WI. Consumers who purchased oysters after June 9, 2023 should check the packaging to see if they were harvested from location NS 10 on June 9, 2023. Contaminated shellfish can cause illness if eaten raw, particularly in people with compromised immune systems. Food contaminated with norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal. Consumers of these products who are experiencing symptoms of norovirus illness should contact their healthcare provider, who should report their symptoms to their local Health Department.

On June 30, 2023, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) reported to CDC an outbreak consisting of 9 cases of norovirus illness associated with the consumption of oysters from Nova Scotia. The oysters harvested from Nova Scotia were sold in both Canada and the U.S. FDA is working with federal, state, and local officials, and with Canadian public health authorities to investigate this outbreak, obtain additional information on distribution of the oysters, and determine if additional illnesses have occurred.

Retailers should not sell or serve raw oysters from harvest location NS 10 with a harvest date of June 9, 2023, which will be printed on product tags.

oysters_shutterstock

Audience

  • Restaurants and food retailers that have received shipments of frozen raw oysters, in half shell, Individual Quick Freezing (IQF), and block form, harvested between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 and on 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II, and exported by Dai One Food Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea (ROK).
  • Consumers, especially those who are or could become pregnant, the elderly, and persons with weakened immune systems, who have recently consumed raw oysters in Hawaii, Georgia, or Minnesota and suspect they have food poisoning should seek medical care immediately.

Product

  • Frozen oysters harvested between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 and on 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II, Dai One Food Co., Ltd., ROK. The oysters were shipped from the ROK and distributed in Hawaii, Georgia, and Minnesota.
  • The Korean firm has voluntarily recalled frozen raw half shell oysters, frozen IQF oysters, and frozen oyster blocks harvested from Designated Area II harvest area between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 and on 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 including lot numbers D021031, D021041, and D020481.

Purpose

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers not to eat, as well as restaurants along with food retailers not to sell, and to dispose of Dai One Food Co., Ltd., frozen raw half shell, IQF, and block form oysters with harvest dates between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 and 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II and sold in Hawaii, Georgia, and Minnesota.

Summary of Problem and Scope

The Hawaii Department of Health notified the FDA of five illnesses from individuals who consumed raw oyster shooters at a restaurant in Hawaii on 5/10/23. Traceback information revealed the source for the implicated raw oysters was from a shipment by Dai One Food Co., Ltd., ROK, harvested on 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II. Samples collected from the 04/14/2022 harvest date were tested for the presence of norovirus. Norovirus GII was detected in one of the two samples collected. Further traceback information identified shipments from Dai One Food Co., Ltd., ROK of oysters harvested on 4/13 2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II were also distributed to Georgia.

In addition, the Minnesota Department of Health notified the FDA of five norovirus illnesses from individuals who consumed raw oysters at a restaurant in Minnesota on 6/3/2023 and 6/4/2023. Traceback information revealed the source for the implicated raw oysters was from a shipment by Dai One Food Co., Ltd., ROK, harvested between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 in Designated Area No. II. These oysters were exported to a distributor in New York.

FDA Actions

The FDA is issuing this alert advising consumers not to eat and restaurants and food retailers not to sell oysters harvested between 2/10/2022 and 2/24/2022 and on 4/13/2022 and 4/14/2022 from Designated Area No. II from Dai One Food Co., Ltd., in ROK, due to possible norovirus GII contamination. The FDA notified State Shellfish Authorities and the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) of the import and harvest details.

As the FDA continues to monitor the investigation, we will provide additional information on further interstate distribution and provide assistance to states as needed. If contaminated oysters are found to have been distributed to additional states, we will update this public health alert. Please check back for more information.

Symptoms of Norovirus

Norovirus can cause a sporadic gastroenteritis, in populations ranging from children to the elderly. The infections are more frequent in children under age 5 than in adults. The most common symptoms of norovirus are diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and stomach pain. Other symptoms include fever, headache, and body ache.

Most people infected with norovirus begin to develop symptoms 12 to 48 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last one to four days.

What Do Restaurants and Retailers Need to Do?

Restaurants and retailers should not sell the potentially affected raw oysters. Restaurants and retailers should dispose of any products by throwing them in the garbage or returning to their distributor for destruction.

Restaurants and retailers should also be aware that the oysters may be a source of pathogens and should control the potential for cross–contamination of food processing equipment and the food processing environment. They should follow the steps below:

  • Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators who have processed and packaged any potentially contaminated products need to be concerned about cross contamination of cutting surfaces and utensils through contact with the potentially contaminated products.
  • Retailers that have sold bulk product should clean and sanitize the containers used to hold the product.
  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the likelihood of cross–contamination.

Audience

Restaurants and food retailers that have received shipments of oysters harvested between January 16, 2023 and February 17, 2023, from Deep Bay subarea 14-8 landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153 and #1411195 in British Columbia, Canada.

Product

  • Oysters harvested between January 16, 2023, and February 17, 2023, from Deep Bay subarea 14-8 landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153 and #1411195 in British Columbia, Canada.
  • Packaged oysters include the harvest area information on their packaging.

Purpose

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat, and restaurants and food retailers not to sell, and to dispose of oysters that were harvested between January 16, 2023 and February 17, 2023, from Deep Bay subarea 14-8 landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153, and #1411195 in British Columbia, Canada. Consumers who purchased oysters after January 16, 2023 should check the packaging to see if they were harvested in Deep Bay from the affected landfiles of subarea 14-8, landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153, and #1411195. Contaminated shellfish can cause illness if eaten raw, particularly in people with compromised immune systems. Food contaminated with norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal. Consumers of these products who are experiencing symptoms of norovirus illness should contact their healthcare provider, who should report their symptoms to their local Health Department.

Summary of Problem and Scope

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is working with federal, state, and local officials, and with Canadian public health authorities on a norovirus outbreakExternal Link Disclaimer linked to raw oysters from British Columbia, Canada. Currently, illnesses have only been reported in Canada with no known cases of norovirus associated with these oysters reported in the U.S. The FDA is alerting restaurants, retailers and consumers because it is possible that states received these oysters through distribution to the U.S.

Retailers should not sell or serve raw oysters harvested from BC 14-8 landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153 and #1411195, with harvest dates starting as early as January 16, 2023, which will be printed on product tags.

Shellfish can cause illness if eaten raw, particularly in people with compromised immune systems. Food contaminated with norovirus may look, smell, and taste normal.

FDA Actions

The FDA is issuing this alert advising consumers to not eat, and restaurants and food retailers to not sell, oysters harvested between January 16, 2023 and February 17, 2023, from BC 14-8 landfiles #0278744, #0278742, #0278741, #0278740, #1414396, #0319716, #1414456, #1414457, #1400483, #1411206, #1407063, #1408485, #0278739, #0278737, #1403139, #0278734, #1411153 and #1411195, British Columbia, Canada due to possible norovirus contamination. The FDA is awaiting information on distribution of the oysters and will continue to monitor the investigation and provide assistance to state authorities as needed.

Symptoms of Norovirus

People of all ages can get infected and sick with norovirus. The most common symptoms of norovirus are diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and stomach pain. Other symptoms include fever, headache, and body ache.

A person usually develops symptoms 12 to 48 hours after being exposed to norovirus. Most people with norovirus illness get better within 1 to 3 days.

If you have norovirus illness, you can feel extremely ill, and vomit or have diarrhea many times a day. This can lead to dehydration, especially in young children, older adults, and people with other illnesses. Symptoms of dehydration include decrease in urination, dry mouth and throat, and feeling dizzy when standing up. Children who are dehydrated may cry with few or no tears and be unusually sleepy or fussy. 

If you think you or someone you are caring for is severely dehydrated, call your healthcare provider.

Recommendations for Restaurants and Retailers

Restaurants and retailers should not sell/serve the potentially contaminated oysters. Restaurants and retailers should dispose of any products by throwing them in the garbage or returning to their distributor for destruction.

Restaurants and retailers should also be aware that shellfish may be a source of pathogens and should control the potential for cross-contamination of food processing equipment and the food processing environment. They should follow the steps below:

  • Wash hands with warm water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators who have processed and packaged any potentially contaminated products need to be concerned about cross-contamination of cutting surfaces and utensils through contact with the potentially contaminated products.
  • Retailers that have sold bulk product should clean and sanitize the containers used to hold the product.
  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the likelihood of cross-contamination.

Crohn’s disease is a chronic condition characterized by inflammation and irritation in the digestive tract. While it most commonly affects the small and large intestines, it can affect any part of the digestive tract.

Researchers estimate that over 500,000 people in the United States have Crohn’s disease. Studies also show that the condition has become more common in the U.S. and in Europe. 

The cause of Crohn’s disease remains unknown. Researchers previously found that a version of the norovirus that occurs in mice (MNV) causes cell death in panted cells – the cells that line the small intestine—with a specific gene deletion. 

Understanding more about how MNV triggers paneth cell death—a key marker of Crohn’s disease—could lead to new treatment strategies for the condition. 

Recently, researchers investigated how MNV might trigger Crohn’s disease in mouse models and human tissue samples. 

“Specifically, we identified a protective molecule called API5 that is normally released by special T cells, but that norovirus infection interferes with its release,” he added. 

The study was published in NatureTrusted Source.

As of ay June 10, 118 people have become sick with gastrointestinal illness on 16 separate river trips down the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

Most of the illness was reported in May, with no new cases reported since June 2.

Grand Canyon National Park has been monitoring the cases that have affected visitors on the Colorado River and also in the backcountry. 

A public health team (a collaboration among Grand Canyon National Park, the National Park Service Office of Public Health, Coconino County Health and Human Services, Arizona Department of Health Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is currently working to address increased reports of gastrointestinal illnesses among river rafters and hikers, according to the park. 

A virtual town hall with river related stakeholders was held June 10. The public health team reviewed what is known about the GI illnesses, thanked the outfitters for their help and diligence and reached out for additional assistance with researching this outbreak.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is collaborating with provincial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada to investigate an outbreak of norovirus and gastrointestinal illnesses involving four provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, and Ontario.

Investigation findings have identified consumption of spot prawns as the source of the outbreak. All of the individuals who became ill reported eating spot prawns before their illnesses occurred. More information is needed to determine how the spot prawns became contaminated with norovirus.

On May 31, 2022, the CFIA issued a food recall warning for several lot codes of live spot prawns that are associated with the illnesses under investigation. The recalled products have been sold in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, and Ontario, and may have been distributed in other provinces and territories. The CFIA is continuing its food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated food recall warnings.

Do not eat, use, sell or serve the recalled spot prawns. Check to see if you have the recalled spot prawns at home. If you do, throw them out and wash your hands.

The outbreak investigation is ongoing and additional actions to protect public health will be taken as needed. The public health notice will be updated as the investigation evolves.

As of June 1, 2022, there have been 48 cases of norovirus and gastrointestinal illness reported in the following provinces: British Columbia (11), Alberta (12), Manitoba (19), and Ontario (6). Individuals became sick between mid-May and late-May 2022, and no deaths have been reported. Although not all cases of illness have been tested, laboratory testing has confirmed the presence of a norovirus infection.

Mantab Inc. is recalling Below Zero brand whole, frozen raspberries because of possible norovirus contamination.

The recalled product has been sold in Quebec, Saskatchewan and Ontario.

Consumers, retailers, and restaurant owners should check to see if they have the recalled products in their homes or establishments. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the location where they were purchased.